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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 7:25 pm 
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washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 7:36 pm 
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wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

Merle's one of those "I ain't from here but I got here as fast as I could" Texans.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 7:55 pm 
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washing machine wrote:
Are people outside of Texas as particular about classifying "Texas Country/Outlaw Country" as it's own sub genre within country proper? I'm talking Willie, Waylon, Merle, Townes and all of their contemporaries within that particular place and time in the history of country music. So much of this music shares so much more in common with LA and Greenwich Village than Nashville at the time. More Gram Parsons and Bob Dylan than Dolly Parton and Glen Campbell.

Five favorites of mine:

Spoiler: show
TVZ - Loretta


Jerry Jeff Walker - Up Against the Wall Redneck Mother


Guy Clark - LA Freeway


Waylon & Willie - I Can Get Off on You


Michael Murphey - Alleys of Austin

I hate sub-genre-ing.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 7:57 pm 
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durdencommatyler wrote:
washing machine wrote:
Are people outside of Texas as particular about classifying "Texas Country/Outlaw Country" as it's own sub genre within country proper? I'm talking Willie, Waylon, Merle, Townes and all of their contemporaries within that particular place and time in the history of country music. So much of this music shares so much more in common with LA and Greenwich Village than Nashville at the time. More Gram Parsons and Bob Dylan than Dolly Parton and Glen Campbell.

Five favorites of mine:

Spoiler: show
TVZ - Loretta


Jerry Jeff Walker - Up Against the Wall Redneck Mother


Guy Clark - LA Freeway


Waylon & Willie - I Can Get Off on You


Michael Murphey - Alleys of Austin

I hate sub-genre-ing.

Listen to those songs, Joey.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 8:05 pm 
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washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

Merle's one of those "I ain't from here but I got here as fast as I could" Texans.

He never lived there as for as I know.

_________________
”Maybe greed is all cocks at the end." - Jaime Lannister


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 8:06 pm 
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washing machine wrote:
Listen to those songs, Joey.

What makes you think I haven't?


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 8:08 pm 
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durdencommatyler wrote:
washing machine wrote:
Listen to those songs, Joey.

What makes you think I haven't?

No, I mean right now. Listen to them.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 8:12 pm 
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washing machine wrote:
durdencommatyler wrote:
washing machine wrote:
Listen to those songs, Joey.

What makes you think I haven't?

No, I mean right now. Listen to them.

I'M AT WORK


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 8:20 pm 
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wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

Merle's one of those "I ain't from here but I got here as fast as I could" Texans.

He never lived there as for as I know.

Well hell. He's an honorary Texan in my book and I will continue to include him in the pantheon every time I hear his cover of Pancho & Lefty or this T-Bone Burnett recorded gem, dammit!


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 9:55 pm 
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washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

Merle's one of those "I ain't from here but I got here as fast as I could" Texans.

He never lived there as for as I know.

Well hell. He's an honorary Texan in my book and I will continue to include him in the pantheon every time I hear his cover of Pancho & Lefty or this T-Bone Burnett recorded gem, dammit!

Is STP an honorary Seattle Band?

_________________
”Maybe greed is all cocks at the end." - Jaime Lannister


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat August 04, 2018 10:14 pm 
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wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

Merle's one of those "I ain't from here but I got here as fast as I could" Texans.

He never lived there as for as I know.

Well hell. He's an honorary Texan in my book and I will continue to include him in the pantheon every time I hear his cover of Pancho & Lefty or this T-Bone Burnett recorded gem, dammit!

Is STP an honorary Seattle Band?

Is an avocado not an honorary breakfast food?


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sun August 05, 2018 1:34 am 
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While we were in Kansas City our rental has Sirius so we listened to the "outlaw" channel that Willie Nelson has. Lots of good stuff there, it was almost good enough to get a Sirius radio/sub.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sun August 05, 2018 2:26 am 
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washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
washing machine wrote:
wease wrote:
I think those artists associated with the "Outlaw" country movement in the late 60's/ 70's weren't classified that way based, necessarily, on the music itself. (Some lyrical content, maybe.) It was mostly attributed to them based on HOW they made their music. It was outside the cookie cutter formula the Nashville establishment felt was the only way to make records. Lyrical themes weren't too far off from what mainstream country was producing at the time. And the music itself was as country as it gets. And part of the attitude the Outlaws had came from admiring artists outside country. Johnny Cash loved Dylan. Even had him on his show. Waylon covered songs from artists as diverse as the Marshall Tucker Band and Steely Dan. They just didn't give a fuck. If it's a good song, it's a good song and they carried that over into making their own music.

That's the definition of Outlaw Country, for sure. There's a distinct sound that comes from the Texas branch of artists within that genre, though. So much so that the second and third wave of "Texas Country" pays plenty of homage lyrically and sonically to Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff, and the Holy Trinity of Willie, Waylon and Merle.

Haggard isn't from Texas, tho. He's a Bakersfield boy like Buck Owens. And later Dwight Yoakum. So, I wouldn't really say Merle is part of the Texas Holy Trinity. That's why I said it's more an attitude than anything else.

Merle's one of those "I ain't from here but I got here as fast as I could" Texans.

He never lived there as for as I know.

Well hell. He's an honorary Texan in my book and I will continue to include him in the pantheon every time I hear his cover of Pancho & Lefty or this T-Bone Burnett recorded gem, dammit!

Is STP an honorary Seattle Band?

Is an avocado not an honorary breakfast food?

We’re having it for breakfast tomorrow.

_________________
”Maybe greed is all cocks at the end." - Jaime Lannister


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sun August 05, 2018 2:31 am 
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Willie, Cash, Jennings :heartbeat:

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P.s.
I'm the drummer


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Mon August 06, 2018 4:36 am 
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Bammer wrote:
Does anyone know if Luke Combs is legit? Like does he write his own songs, or is he the Taylor Swift of country music?

It's hard for me to tell because he is definitely not a pretty face. He's not your typical no-talent shitstain thrown out there purely due to sex appeal. I like his voice.

For comparison I get the impression that Chris Stapleton is much more "legit" as an artist. I just can't tell if Luke Combs is respectable like that.

I find myself enjoying many of his songs (not all), but I don't know if I should feel embarrassed about this or not.

A little help, here?

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There’s a good chance I posted this while sitting on the toilet.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Mon August 06, 2018 5:54 am 
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Bammer wrote:
Bammer wrote:
Does anyone know if Luke Combs is legit? Like does he write his own songs, or is he the Taylor Swift of country music?

It's hard for me to tell because he is definitely not a pretty face. He's not your typical no-talent shitstain thrown out there purely due to sex appeal. I like his voice.

For comparison I get the impression that Chris Stapleton is much more "legit" as an artist. I just can't tell if Luke Combs is respectable like that.

I find myself enjoying many of his songs (not all), but I don't know if I should feel embarrassed about this or not.

A little help, here?

Some Hayes Carll is what you need, friend.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Fri October 19, 2018 3:39 pm 
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I like to occasionally listen to Hank III (usually Straight to Hell), but wish he didn't do that super raspy thing with his voice.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat March 16, 2019 6:01 am 
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i could listen to this on repeat for 3-5 hours


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VinylGuy wrote:
This is the definitive battle rap movie ever.


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat March 16, 2019 1:02 pm 
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Galway Girl by Steve Earle or gtfo

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Clouuuuds Rolll byyy...BANG BANG BANG BANG


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 Post subject: Re: Country Music
PostPosted: Sat March 16, 2019 1:22 pm 
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E.H. Ruddock wrote:
Galway Girl by Steve Earle or gtfo


That song is a national anthem here almost. The Mundy version moreso though.


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