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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Wed September 19, 2018 1:02 am 
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LoathedVermin72 wrote:
Higgs wrote:
Said it before and I'll say it again, the last 2 albums are my favourites. Unbelievably good stuff.

Ah, they say it's just rock and roll
But it gets you right down to your soul.


Enjoy the show VG - it's an absolute cracker. Best show I've been to in the past 2 years.

Boy I couldn’t disagree more. Last two albums made me lose interest in Cave.

That's cool LV. Your and my musical tastes are pretty much polar opposites. No big thing.

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Wed September 19, 2018 2:45 am 
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Im listening to that live version from Distant Sky. So quiet and calm and at the same time so full of emotion and power.
I agree that this one followed by that wonder that’s called skeleton tree are such a wonderful combination...Skeleton Tree is on my top ten for sure.

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Wed September 19, 2018 3:12 am 
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"Moonland" is so great. Could Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!! be my favorite Cave record? Hmm...

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Wed September 19, 2018 9:20 pm 
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One thing that sets the last two records apart is that they are nearly entirely humorless--even though Cave's lyrics and subjects have always been dark, brooding, and pensive, there was a gallows humor that pervades most of his records that brings in some levity (D!L!D! is a great example of this). Distant Sky doesn't have this for obvious reasons, but it really stated to fall away with Push the Sky.

That said, I do like the last two records. But I need to be in a very particular mood for them.

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu September 27, 2018 2:22 am 
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The Red Hand Files - #02

Q: It seems that in your last few albums you have been writing songs about animals and nature? Do you have any animals at home? (JENN, BOSTON, UNITED STATES)

A: Dear Jenn,

As I write this I am sitting in a studio with Warren in California working on the new record. It‘s a strange and wonderful thing and very different from what has gone before. We are under its spell. In the meantime I have been inundated with questions. The response to The Red Hand Files has caught me completely unawares, so thank you and everyone else very much.

To answer your question - we have two family dogs. A gentle moony dog with sad eyes and cancer called Otis and a psychotic little dachshund called Nosferatu, whose one great enterprise in life is to bite me. I think it is safe to say that I love these dogs considerably more than they love me. They are devoted to my wife and guard her from me with their lives.

Nature does feature more and more in my songs. Our natural environment has become a kind of crime scene as we tear away at it, and exploit it, and burn it, and melt it. This is of considerable concern to me as an inhabitant of this world, and I feel a certain amount of existential shame for being a part of the generation that bled it dry. It saddens me as I grow old to leave such a mess for our children to deal with.

Having said that, the natural world in my songs is less about the destruction of the environment and more concerned with the biblical notion of paradise, within which I can set my human dramas of suffering and transcendence. My natural world is nature unspoilt, but with a kind of apocalyptic consciousness. The nature in my songs knows what’s ultimately coming. It is a world of metaphor, where nature becomes alive with the promise of God, where the moon is a mute witness and the stars hang in the air like questions.

For me, the imagination is essentially religious as it reaches beyond truth toward meaning. And meaning itself is a kind of truth unburdened by proof. Science has its duty to truth, and so it should, but the songwriter and the poet move beyond what is known into the unknown world. They spend their time in a kind of dream world – a realm where God and his ghosts dwell, banished there by grim reason and rationality. This is our absurd and deluded dominion in all its feverish wonder. It is the enchanted forest. This is the world from where I draw my songs. If you are an artist, well, I’ll see you there, no doubt. If not, you can sail there on my songs!

A final note on the dogs – my wife, Susie, is devoted to them and it would be fair to say she shows more understanding and empathy for the animal world than she does for the human world. Susie can look into the berserk eyes of Nosferatu and just melt him. She is a dog-whisper. She has the same effect on me. She is a husband-whisperer.

___

Q: What is it that the seemingly recent connection to your fans is giving you to encourage you to hold these forum-style events? (LEISA, CALOUNDRA, AUSTRALIA)

Q: Do you really feel the love of your fans? And if you do, what does it bring you? (SUZANNE, AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS)

A: Dear Leisa and Suzanne,

The forum style events, which I will be doing more of next year, have to do with many things. First of all, the concerts have been expanding, which for the band and me is clearly very exciting. I feel the show which we are doing works on a large scale – in fact I enjoy doing it more as I still feel I have a very direct connection to my audience, but there is also a massive transcendent effect that is difficult to resist. However, I am very aware that the larger format can feel alienating to long-standing fans and I wanted to find a way of staying connected to them. This is partly the reason why I have decided to do the In Conversation events and also The Red Hand Files.

Leisa, when you say ‘a seemingly recent connection’, this is both true and untrue. I have always felt connected to the audience. I feel though that these days there is a place that exists beneath the stratum of our actual lived selves – a river of light that can be accessed through the live performances. It is this river of light that flows through us all and binds us together.

But there is another reason why I have decided to do the In Conversation events and The Red Hand Files, and that is a growing need for me to speak about certain things and not finding the appropriate places to do so. Some of the issues are difficult and require a bit of room, or space, or even nuance. I think there is much to speak about outside music as well as inside. I think people increasingly have a hunger to engage in alternative ideas about all manner of things and this is evidenced in the kind of questions that have been sent to me. I also receive a lot of mail these days from people in difficult situations and I feel that I have some experience which I can pass on.

Finally, in response to the ‘do I feel the love?’ question - when I am on stage I feel a very deep connection with my audience that transcends anything I have felt previously. I experience people on a ‘soul’ level that for me is extremely powerful. When I look into the audience, I feel I can connect with each of them individually on an acutely personal level. I can see inside them. The more attentive I become, the stronger the feeling. To physically engage with the audience is important too - actual touching builds both a real and a metaphorical connection and it is an essential component to the live shows. I am stealing energy when I do that - as if the audience are a power source. Perhaps I am giving it out too. The circuit is complete.

Without being hyperbolic, this feeling of collective love has saved my life. It is a transcendent circle that just seems to grow stronger. It is religious. A dear friend of mine, who is essentially an atheist and has no time for religious institutions, says she finds her spiritual transcendence at a Bad Seeds show. I believe her. I feel it too. It feels open and urgent and honest, and ultimately uplifting, moving us towards a sense of betterment and meaning. I arrive at this place, not by the music, but by the energy transmitted from the audience. I am awed.

Much love, Nick

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu September 27, 2018 12:43 pm 
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God I need to read more Nick Cave. He is a beautiful and powerful creature.


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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu September 27, 2018 5:03 pm 
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I hadn't listend to Murder Ballads since college. God i forgot what a song/story Where the Wild Roses Grow is....


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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu September 27, 2018 6:03 pm 
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The Lyre of Orpheus is my favorite. I'm not sure how, when or why it became lodged in my psyche so deeply. I find myself reaching for it often these days.

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu September 27, 2018 7:04 pm 
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Top 5 Cave albums?

Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!
Henry’s Dream
Let Love In
Tender Prey
Abattoir Blues / The Lyre of Orpheus

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu October 04, 2018 3:54 am 
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The Red Hand Files - #03

Q: I write, and a lot of what you've said about it in the past really resonates with me, possibly because my dad was a teacher too. I feel the process is like trying to describe something which I can only see imperfectly, or out of the corner of my eye. Did you ever experience that? Also, I hope you record Fireflies. (S., LONDON, UK)

A: Dear S.,

I very much like your description of the creative process – to see something imperfectly or out of the corner of your eye. This is exactly right. A good song idea never fronts up to you, never looks you in the eye, never announces itself - at least not in my experience. Lyric ideas are as illusive as fireflies. They are spirits flitting between the trees. The moment you give them your attention, they are gone.

But still you write, because over the years you have learned - midst the nonsensical hieroglyphics you compulsively scrawl in your notebooks, the dumb single lines that stare contemptuously back at you, the song titles that excite you then lose their magic the next time you look at them, the half-baked and derivative ideas, the stolen lines, the Freudian doodles, the desperate over-egged metaphors and lunatic, pencil-snapping, last-ditch attempts at something, my God, anything - you have learned to hold fast and trust. You have learned from hard-won experience that within this pile of words something mysterious is going on, something beyond the reaches of your understanding, something that simply takes its own sweet time and of which you are a tiny part - you are the guy who turns up to hold the pencil - and that suddenly, without warning, you find you have taken one line of no consequence and attached it to another line of no consequence and a kind of reverberation begins between the two lines, a throbbing - or as I like to call it, a ‘shimmering’ - it is something you can actually see! And as the two combined lines pulsate, they begin to collect significance impossibly, and at a rapid rate, to load up with meaning, even to call down a melody, and your heart begins to beat as if for the first time in God knows how long, and you come alive, you become an actual person, a functional, competent human being deserving of their place on this earth, because you know, suddenly, more than anything, that you are on to something and this shimmering convergence of words is setting off on its journey to change the world.

As for Fireflies, we are still searching for it.

Much love, Nick

___


Dear All,

I am loving reading your questions. They are wonderful things. As some are more like short novels, the questions are sometimes embedded deep in the letter. Very deep! I may need to edit and post just the actual question. I hope this is OK. Thank you all for your very thoughtful and considered questions.

Nick

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu October 04, 2018 2:05 pm 
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Im going to see him next week!!

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Wed October 10, 2018 3:13 pm 
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The Red Hand Files - #04

Q: Can you talk a bit about Warren? (FREDDY, LONDON, UK)

Q: Do you hang out with Warren a lot, or just whilst recording? I'm hoping you say you do, as there are friendship goals. (EMMA, CORK, IRELAND)

Q: Why do people take so long to understand the absence of love? (PAUL, BRIDGEWATER, TASMANIA)


A: Dear Freddy, Emma and Paul,

Warren officially joined the Bad Seeds when we were working on the Murder Ballads album in 1995. His influence was apparent from the start. Over the years I have developed a relationship with Warren that goes way beyond a professional collaboration and we are the best of friends - and yes, Emma, we hang out a lot. There is a certain sanctity in this friendship in that it has traversed all manner of troubles over the last twenty or so years, yet remains as resilient as ever. On a professional level we have developed a style of songwriting based almost exclusively on a kind of spiritual intuition and improvisation that feels, as Henry Miller prescribes, calm, joyful and reckless. In the songwriting sessions we sit and focus and grin and crash around in things. Warren is essentially an ideas machine (anyone who has worked in the studio with him will tell you the same) and it is an extraordinary privilege to be around him, both on stage and in the studio - and anywhere else, actually. When he is in full flight, he is unstoppable, and he is rarely not in full flight.

When we write songs together, we do so in a small studio near Brighton. I sit in one room with my piano and lyric books and microphone, and Warren sits in another room with his many instruments. There is a glass wall between us. We don’t discuss what we are doing, but simply start to play together. It is purely improvised. We make eye contact through the glass wall. This is essential. I can’t really define it but something happens; something that has to do with intuition and trust and jeopardy - the willingness to risk and, of course, to fail. We have what is called the ‘Walk of Shame’. This is when one of us reaches for an idea that, well, clearly sucks and we epically and embarrassingly fail. If we are not doing the ‘Walk of Shame’ fairly regularly, we are not doing our job as we are not reaching beyond what is comfortable.

The concept of collaboration has always been the power source of the Bad Seeds. On some level these collaborations have an intensity to them that can step beyond the limits of friendship – sometimes a creative collaboration is defined by an honesty, a vulnerability and a brutal intensity that a normal friendship cannot contain. Sadly, a consequence of collaboration is that it can, on occasion, wear away at friendship, in the sense that we put so much of ourselves into the creative union that we simply forget to be friends.

The current Bad Seeds may indeed be a testament to the corrosive capacity of collaboration. The Bad Seeds these days are on some level defined by a series of absences. It is difficult for some to see the Bad Seeds without also seeing the spirits of Blixa Bargeld, with his terrifying, tortured guitar or Mick Harvey, with his vast musical intelligence and his steely, censorious eyebrow. These extraordinarily intense musical collaborations found their natural ends but, even so, are still woven into the cloth of the band. Dear Conway and his ramshackle piano, Barry Adamson or Kid Congo Powers, or the limitless creative spirit of Anita Lane, are all strangely present within their absence.

Absence is not vacancy. Vacancy has no voice. Vacancy is empty and banal and atheistic. Absence, on the other hand, is a fertile ground where loss and love coalesce around memory to create ghosts that live among us. Absence is alive with energy. The Bad Seeds remain an entity that incorporates the spirits of the band’s past members, the residue of their enormous creative energies and their remembered voices. They are all on stage with us. In my view, no one has actually gone.

In the end, I think Warren and I understand that the longevity of a collaboration depends to a certain extent on the conservation of friendship – friendships need care and constant maintenance – and so we exist as friends beyond the work as well. We go about our work - sometimes together, sometimes apart - and we wish each other happiness, and when one of us is in trouble, the other comes a-running, as the song goes.

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Wed October 10, 2018 4:11 pm 
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Tonight its the night!

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu October 11, 2018 1:44 am 
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Nick Cave wrote:
The current Bad Seeds may indeed be a testament to the corrosive capacity of collaboration. The Bad Seeds these days are on some level defined by a series of absences. It is difficult for some to see the Bad Seeds without also seeing the spirits of Blixa Bargeld, with his terrifying, tortured guitar or Mick Harvey, with his vast musical intelligence and his steely, censorious eyebrow. These extraordinarily intense musical collaborations found their natural ends but, even so, are still woven into the cloth of the band. Dear Conway and his ramshackle piano, Barry Adamson or Kid Congo Powers, or the limitless creative spirit of Anita Lane, are all strangely present within their absence.

Absence is not vacancy. Vacancy has no voice. Vacancy is empty and banal and atheistic. Absence, on the other hand, is a fertile ground where loss and love coalesce around memory to create ghosts that live among us. Absence is alive with energy. The Bad Seeds remain an entity that incorporates the spirits of the band’s past members, the residue of their enormous creative energies and their remembered voices. They are all on stage with us. In my view, no one has actually gone.

Wow, this is very beautifully put.

:nice:


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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu October 11, 2018 11:42 am 
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What an amazing amazing night. He really knows how to control his crowd. It was something else I tell ya.
Musically they are in such a good moment. The new songs sound so good live. They are as haunting and tense as in the studio but there is a rocking live element to it. And the old stuff sounds more relevant live.
Cave is insane in his obsession to connect with the crowd. At one point he walked among them and finished an entire song besides the balcony. He stayed there for a while.

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Sat October 13, 2018 1:21 am 
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Setlist from the Buenos Aires show.

Jesus Alone
Magneto
(Interrupted and started again… more )
Higgs Boson Blues
Do You Love Me?
From Her to Eternity
Loverman
Red Right Hand
The Ship Song
Into My Arms
Shoot Me Down
Girl in Amber
Tupelo
Jubilee Street
The Weeping Song
Stagger Lee
Push the Sky Away

Encore:
City of Refuge
The Mercy Seat
Rings of Saturn

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Thu October 25, 2018 1:32 am 
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The Red Hand Files - #05

Dear All,

Now that there are well over a thousand questions – all of which I have, of course, read! – every now and then I’ll try to write some shorter answers. Here goes.
___

Q: Any plans to rock out again a la Grinderman. Ya know, polish off the ol' guitar and give the music world a huge middle finger and sweat like a Fourth of July whore in heat? (MARVIN, LEWISTON, ID, USA)

A: Dear Marvin,

Many of you have asked about the reformation of Grinderman, although most not with the same lurid flair as you, so I sat with Warren and we discussed whether it was a good idea. We both thought the world needed Grinderman, considering its current emotional climate. Warren wanted to wait until Trump got re-elected, in the hope he would invite us to play ‘No Pussy Blues’ at the presidential celebrations. I’m not sure if he was joking or not. I personally felt there was no urgency, and that the older we got, the better Grinderman would be – the more deranged, the more priapic, and the more morally dubious. We both thought that Grinderman appeared to be a lot more popular now than when it existed, and we wondered whether that was simply the band passing into folklore, or whether the world had become, in the last years, more puritanical, less playful, and more hypersensitive, and that there were a lot of people out there, like you Marvin, who just wanted to listen to a band that fucked things up a bit.

We both thought releasing a Best of Grinderman record was a good idea. We thought it should be a double album.

Finally, we both didn’t know what a Fourth of July whore was.

___

Q: Who or what is the monster under your bed? (BRIAN, NEW ORLEANS, USA)

A: Dear Brian,

I guess, if I were to look under the bed for monsters, I might expect to find some Islamic terrorists, some man-hating feminists, Trump, some rampant AI, some cyber criminals, some neo-Marxist left-wing radicals, some chemical weapons, some right-wing Nazis, Putin, a nuclear explosion, a meteor, a melted ice cap, heaps of murdered farm animals, Roger Waters, and some very, very bad weather – but actually I think what I would probably find, staring back at me, is myself, because most monsters I have ever had to deal with were usually a product of bad thinking, and generally of my own making. Maybe my greatest fear is that there is nothing under the bed at all, just a vast and monstrous vacancy – dustballs, a child’s lost sock, and the ashy residue of dreams. Sometimes, I would rather not look.

___

Q: Technicians of the Sacred by Jerome Rothenberg was placed on the piano in 20,000 Days on Earth. Is there anything you would like to share with your readers about this utterly secret/sacred, glorious work of love? (BEN, BRISTOL, UK)

A: Dear Ben,

Obviously you are acquainted with this wonderful book, so this letter is really to the uninitiated! Technicians of the Sacred by Jerome Rothenberg is an anthology of spiritual writings from around the world. It is probably the single most important book on poetry I have ever read. It has been a heavy influence over my songwriting – more than I’d like to admit. If there is anyone out there struggling to write lyrics, get your hands on this book; immerse yourselves in it, live inside it for a while, free your mind, and you will emerge brimming with ideas. Jerome Rothenberg recently released a revised edition of Technicians, so it is easily available. For those of you who are interested, this is well worth investigating.

___

Q: When you wrote that 'Miley Cyrus floats in the swimming pool in Toluca Lake', was she alive or dead when she was floating there? (STEPHANIE, AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND)

A: Dear Stephanie,

Around 2012, I visited Madame Tussauds Waxworks in Hollywood with my eleven-year-old kids. They became very excited about the waxwork statues of Hannah Montana and Miley Cyrus. They explained to me – although not in exactly these terms – that Hannah Montana was the child self, and that Miley Cyrus was the infanticidal adult self, who literally became a wrecking ball that obliterated her younger persona. In my mind, the Miley Cyrus that floats in the swimming pool in the gated community of Toluca Lake, in the song ‘Higgs Boson Blues’, is a statue made of wax. She is neither dead nor alive. She bobs about in the cool water, circled by pink Amazonian dolphins, and melts under a terrible, blank Californian sky, like a pagan sacrifice to an Aztec Sun God. I hope that clears things up a bit, dear Stephanie.

___

Q: I counted the words in all your lyrics and thought this might be the only way to tell you some of my results. The most used personal pronouns are 'I' (1332) and 'You' (970). The word 'Love', used as a noun, verb or other form, appears around 280 times, followed by 'Eye' or 'Eyes' (134) and 'Night', 'Midnight' or 'Tonight' (126). Did you know that you used the word 'Sorry' about 73 times? If one takes the most frequently used words (overlooking words like 'the', 'a', 'an' etc.) to build a basic sentence (SVO) it would be: I love you. I'm somehow not surprised, are you?

The essence of everything seems to be love, in your lyrics, and all our lives. (Yes, I was bored. Terribly bored.) (LARS, COLOGNE, GERMANY)

A: Dear Lars,

I have printed your piece of writing in its entirety. Your efforts deserve as much. I have nothing to add, although perhaps I could talk briefly about the strange alliance between boredom and epiphany. Boredom is often dismissed as a lack of imagination – this is not true. Boredom is a signal that we are indeed imaginative creatures, and that the existential distress of being in a state of blah is often the mind readying itself for the epiphany. In your case, Lars, you were ‘terribly bored’. Boredom provoked you to action. You did your crazy statistics. You arrived at the conclusion that love is the essence of everything. By doing so, you have moved the world one step closer to its redemption. Congratulations! You are awesome!



Much love, Nick

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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Sat October 27, 2018 10:37 pm 
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Saw him last night for the first time in years and holy fuck.


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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Sat October 27, 2018 10:48 pm 
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Nick Cave sounds like an incredibly annoying person


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 Post subject: Re: Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds
PostPosted: Sat October 27, 2018 10:54 pm 
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New Grinderman stuff is promising, though


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